Cause & Affect Methodology

Cause & Affect first researches the issues facing a particular region in order to tailor their giving in the most effective manner possible.

1) Before embarking on a humanitarian mission, Cause & Affect first researches the issues facing a particular region in order to tailor their giving in the most effective manner possible.

2) By tapping into the extensive international network he has amassed with over 13 years of global travel, Mr. Carter is able to consult local contacts and draw upon communal ideas and expertise. Cause & Affect exhaustively researches which projects are effectively dealing with the pressing issues, seeking partnerships with the most successful while avoiding the less efficient.

3) Based on the needs of the community or the partner organization they have paired up with, Cause & Affect then decides on their course of action: how best to administer aid. Sometimes, they provide money directly to families in particularly desperate situations (such as those suffering from medical maladies or natural disasters), while in other instances, they provide funds for local non-governmental organizations (NGOs). In cases in which they assist local NGOs, they try to purchase needed supplies, instead of merely handing over money, in order to insure their donations are wisely spent.

4) Upon the deliverance of goods or funds, Cause & Affect provides extensive paperwork, including official receipts of payment and photos from the beneficiaries; all relevant financial information is also appended to their website.

5) When possible, Cause & Affect maintains contact with the recipients after assisting a project or family; by forming a relationship and following up with these projects or families, the foundation can choose to pass along successive donations, if the need persists and the previous funds have been well-spent.

6) After making a targeted donation, Cause & Affect then documents the entire exchange in order to pass along the details (including photos and videos) to its donors, supporters and contacts around the world. By receiving these personalized reports, their donors receive the satisfaction of seeing exactly where their donations have been spent.


Example 1: Orphanages in Phnom Penh, Cambodia:

At the Lighthouse orphanage, Mr. Carter worked with another organization to build a chicken coop, which provides sustainable form of income and teaches the children about the economic process behind a business.

1. At the Lighthouse orphanage, Mr. Carter worked with another organization to build a chicken coop, which provides sustainable form of income and teaches the children about the economic process behind a business. This requires forward thinking and long-term planning, which is important for the project’s management team to learn, as fiscal discipline needs to be stressed!

2. While at Lighthouse, Mr. Carter also helped distribute promotional posters to bring international tourists to the orphanages with bags of rice and money to help fund the project.

3. In the NACA Orphanage, Mr. Carter helped the children raise income for the orphanage by contracting a local T-shirt producer to make shirts for the kids to sell.

4. While visiting Chey Prach Orphanage, after noticing a very basic kitchen supposed to provide food for 50 orphans, Mr. Carter acquired a Dream Kitchen list and went to the local market to purchase ALL of the supplies listed (50 plates, 50 sets of chopsticks, 50 soup bowls, etc.) for a grand total of $85!

5. Working in tandem with C.C.H. Orphanage, Mr. Carter sought out kids that were living in the municipal garbage dump, resulting in the eventual rescue of two girls
to the Lighthouse Orphanage. Their relocation was a life-saver.


Example 2: Humanitarian Trip to West Africa

Mr. Carter helped fund a local Guinea-Bissau clinic that helps HIV+ mothers avoid the vertical transmission of the virus to their children

1. While in Guinea-Bissau , one of the least-developed countries in the world, Mr. Carter discovered the alarmingly high rate of infant mortality: 11% of babies there do not survive their first year and one in five children never live long enough to celebrate their 5th birthday. Fortunately, he was able to help fund a local clinic that helps HIV+ mothers avoid the vertical transmission of the virus to their children. Normally, 25% of these babies would become infected with the virus, but with the use of a drug called Retrovir, the rate is reduced to 2.5%, so for 2,000 women at the clinic, that means around 450 babies are spared from this death sentence.


A Senegalese woman who received "Cycle Beads" to chart her mestrual cycle and prevent pregnancy

2. Another major issue plaguing the entire developing world is over-population. The population of Africa in particular is set to more than double by 2050. While in Senegal , Mr. Carter discovered an amazingly effective and innovative pregnancy-prevention tool called Cycle Beads that rely on the Standard Days Method, allowing local women to chart their own menstrual cycles using these beads so they can avoid unprotected sex during their most fertile days. Since these beads have been embraced by local communities and religious authorities, we donated 500 of them to a group of rural Senegalese villages.

This Malian man was able to fix his bicycle wheelchair and participate in a workshop to earn a living

3. Mali is a land-locked country beset with social, health and educational problems, as it ranks as one of the poorest countries in the world. 75% of its inhabitants live below the poverty line, so one can imagine the hardship faced by the country’s million plus physically-challenged people. Mr. Carter discovered an amazing local association that provides these people with a workshop where they can come and earn a living by making shoes, belts, clothing and much more. In order to enable 6 new members to participate, he facilitates the purchase of 2 new bicycle wheelchairs and paid for the repair of 4 others. He also provided $500 towards micro-grants to help five of these families start local businesses so they can climb out of poverty and earn a living.

Mr. Carter was able to purchase and distribute thousands of dollars of schoolbooks to 3 schools, including this high school in rural Guinea that had nearly no science textbooks

4. West Africa is suffering from a severe shortage in education funding, as most schools are lacking the basic supplies and textbooks needed to instill an adequate education for their students. Two countries where this shortfall is most apparent are Guinea and Mali. With the help of his donors like you, Mr. Carter was able to purchase and distribute thousands of dollars of schoolbooks to 3 schools, including this high school in rural Guinea that had nearly no science textbooks. Similarly, in a remote mountainous region of Mali known as Dogon country, schools were only equipped with chalk for the teachers, so kids had no opportunity to learn how to write. Thankfully, he was able to deliver the notebooks, pens and mini-chalkboards that will allow these eager students the ability to learn how to write.

Through micro-finance this Cape Verdean man was able to purchase goats so that he can produce cheese that he can sell for a profit

5. One of the most effective means of helping people climb out of poverty is through micro-finance, in which local entrepreneurs are provided with the capital (in the form of low-interest loans) to start their own business. In Cape Verde , for example, Mr. Carter financed a loan to allow a local entrepreneur to purchase goats so that he can produce cheese that he can sell for a profit. It’s fantastic to see how a loan of just a few hundred dollars, which will be paid back and recycled to another local entrepreneur in a years time, can help families climb out of poverty and earn a living.

Drawing upon his funds raised, Mr. Carter was able to assist some of the most desperate Mauritanian families

6. Another very serious problems affecting West Africa – and much of the world – is environmental degradation, climate change and the rapid growth of deserts. While in Mauritania , Mr. Carter witnessed this desertification, as thousands of families have been forced from their rural villages due to scarcity of water, firewood and grazing pastures for their animals. Many end up in tented shanty-towns on the outskirts of the capital Noaukchott, a very over-populated city where families live 10 to a tent and suffer from malnutrition, respiratory and water-borne illnesses. Drawing upon his funds raised, Mr. Carter was able to assist some of the most desperate families.

Mr. Carter was able to assist a community of Sierra Leone civil war amputees, most of which lost their limbs as children to the brutal rebels

7. Sierra Leone is a country still feeling the effects of a brutal civil war that ended in 2002. Mr. Carter was able to assist a community of war amputees, most of which lost their limbs as children to the brutal rebels. These guys started their own soccer team, which is the ultimate display of spirit triumphing over one’s physical hardships. As they recounted proudly, “We are survivors, not victims!” With his donor’s money, Mr. Carter also assisted two local organizations that train local students to be Peace Ambassadors, to learn the virtues of non-violence, human rights and conflict resolution, so they can promote this message of peace to friends, family and fellow students and also become more involved in the political process. He continues to support a local organization, AUCAYD, founded by 20 very motivated volunteers that use art, music and dance to provide local kids of Freetown with engaging activities to cultivate their minds. These positive role models encourage these kids to hope for a brighter future.

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